Community fighting Taggart-Miller mega landfill

Residents are fighting a proposal by Taggart-Miller to build a 400-acre landfill and recycling facility near the rural Ottawa town of Carlsbad Springs.

If greenlighted, the Capital Region Resource Recovery Centre (CRRRC) would accept over 1000 tonnes of Ontario garbage daily, including industrial, commercial and contaminated waste. The concerns of residents include water contamination and devaluation of properties.

You can follow this community’s efforts on Twitter @DumptheDump2 and on their websites:
www.dumpthedumpnow.ca
www.dumpthisdump2.ca

Read the media coverage here:

http://www.ottawasun.com/2015/01/10/carlsbad-residents-fear-mega-landfill-at-taggart-miller-site

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/backers-east-end-waste-facility-accept-environment-committee-constraints

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/carlsbad-spring-residents-concerned-about-planned-landfill-1.1356503

http://www.ottawasun.com/2013/02/08/taggart-miller-environmental-services-eyes-new-landfill-near-carlsbad-springs

Diane Deans and Tactical Urbanism

Steps from the Canal

It may have just been a passing comment, but Diane Deans scored some points with me at a committee meeting. In the discussion about the patio project on Elgin Street, this occurred:

You may not be familiar with the term “tactical urbanism”. Here’s a pretty good definition:

…a collection of low-cost, temporary changes to the built environment, usually in cities, intended to improve local neighbourhoods and city gathering places. Tactical Urbanism is also commonly referred to as guerilla urbanism, pop-up urbanism, city repair, or D.I.Y. urbanism.

It really is a wonderful idea. It’s an easy way to spruce up our city streets (like the Glebe BIA is doing by putting out flower boxes for the Tulip Festival), and to adapt them to changing needs, events and seasons.

And I’ll admit; I was a…

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Danger zone in the backyard

Would you let your children play here? This video was shot in an Ottawa resident’s backyard on November 6, 2014. The home is in the middle of a construction zone for a 5-story condo development. Why wasn’t overhead netting or a protective wall installed to safeguard residents and their properties?

Community warned City in 2011 about potential for damage

Multiple homes in Ottawa are still dealing with severe damage after experiencing strong vibrations and various construction processes such as sheet piling, dewatering and drilling from an adjacent condo development site. The damage includes sinking floors, gaps and cracks in the walls and in one case, a collapsed ceiling. Meeting minutes show that the Lowertown community had warned the City of Ottawa and Council in 2011, prior to construction, about potential issues that could result in damage to homes. Residents says they are seeking answers from the City and Council.